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PS4

The Last Of Us 2 Director Addresses The Game's Haters

Seven years after the release of the original, The Last of Us Part II is finally out now on PlayStation 4. Even before release, writer-director Neil Druckmann acknowledged that some fans of the first game would dislike the sequel, and now that the game is out, he’s responded to more of the internet hate. This includes hate directed toward one of the cast members, not because of the actor herself, but the character she plays.

Speaking on former Nintendo boss Reggie Fils-Aime’s podcast, Druckmann said it’s worthless to fight against people when they share their opinions about a game–whether it be good or bad. However, Druckmann said he can’t understand how people get so worked up and upset about fictional characters.

“I think you have to create some separation to say, we made this game, we believe in this game, we’re proud of this game, now it’s out there and it’s like whatever reaction people have–whether they like it or not–that’s fair,” Druckmann said. “That’s their reaction and you don’t fight that. The other thing with the more hateful stuff, the more vile stuff, that’s a little harder. It’s especially harder when I see it happening to team members or cast members who play a particular character in the game.”

“We have an actor, she’s been getting really awful, vile stuff because of a fictional character she’s playing in the game,” Druckmann added. “I just have a hard time wrapping my mind around that. The thing I try to do is just ignore it as much as I can. When things escalate to being serious, there are certain security protocols that we take and I report it to the proper authorities. Then you just try to focus on the positives and focus on distracting yourself with other stuff. But it’s kind of just the reality.”

Also in the interview, Druckmann said he’s been speaking with Chernobyl writer Craig Mazin about this topic. They are currently working together on the HBO TV version of The Last of Us.

“I’ve had a lot of conversations with him about this stuff. He articulated it pretty well, it’s like people have to get educated. This is kind of the cost. When you’re doing something big, and you might disappoint fans, there is a cost to it now,” Druckmann said. “Which is, you’re going to get a certain level of hate, a certain level of vitriol that you just have to deal with. There is no other way to make it go away.”

Despite some portion of the audience disliking The Last of Us Part II, the game broke PlayStation’s sales records with 4 million copies sold in its first three days.

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PS4

The Last Of Us 2 Director Explains That Pearl Jam Plot Hole

The Last of Us Part II writer-director Neil Druckmann has cleared up the apparent plot hole pertaining to the band Pearl Jam. But first, some background. Guitars are used as a symbolic tool to show the bond between Joel and Ellie, with several songs popping up in cutscenes. Guitars even appear as playable objects, and it’s possible for experienced musicians to recreate songs on Ellie’s in-game guitar. But one thing has remained unclear–how is Joel able to perform a song in-game that would have never been released in his world because of the outbreak? The game’s director has an explanation. Whether or not you buy that explanation depends on if you think Joel watched concert videos in his spare time.

In an early cutscene, Joel performs a cover of Pearl Jam’s “Future Days,” which appeared on the album Lightning Bolt. This album released on October 15, 2013–several weeks after September 26, 2013, which is Outbreak Day in the world of The Last of Us Part II. So how did Joel know a song that never got released?

According to director Neil Druckmann, it’s simple–the song was performed live at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois on July 19, and Joel saw a video of it on YouTube.

This makes sense, but it’s a shame that Joel’s canonical backstory on this song doesn’t involve him getting to go to the concert himself. In fact, getting the song in the game was a bit of a difficult task, and Druckmann nearly flew to Seattle to meet with Eddie Vedder.

Joel’s performance of this song can actually be traced back further to a Last of Us performance by voice actors Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson, which included an epilogue to the game in which Joel began teaching Ellie how to play the guitar. This scene ultimately made its way into the sequel.

Unlike the original game, The Last of Us Part II won’t get story DLC, although a multiplayer standalone mode is coming.

  • Last Of Us, Uncharted Dev Talks About Moving To PlayStation 5
  • The Last Us Part 2 Ending Explained – What Happened And Why
  • The Last Of Us Part 2 Director Explains Away The Game's Pearl Jam Plot Hole
  • The Last Of Us 2 Won't Get Story DLC, But An Online Mode Is Coming
  • The Last Of Us Part 2: Every Easter Egg And Reference We've Found
  • 47 Things You May Have Missed In The Last Of Us Part II
  • The Last Of Us 2's Obsession With A Gamer Gotcha Undermines Its Characters
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  • The Last Of Us 2 Walkthrough Part 9: Santa Barbara (All Collectibles, Spoiler-Free)
  • The Last Of Us 2 Walkthrough Part 8: Seattle Day 3 (All Collectibles, Spoiler-Free)

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PS4

The Last Of Us Part 2 Workbench Locations – Where To Find All Workbenches

Note: We’ve gone out of our way not to include spoilers for anything that happens in The Last of Us Part 2, but looking at any photos or reading any descriptions might give away plot details you’d rather now know. You’ve been warned.

There are 25 Workbenches scattered throughout The Last of Us Part 2, and they can be pretty essential to your survival. They’re the only places that you can use gun parts you scavenge throughout the game to upgrade your weapons. What’s more, finding and using every Workbench in the game unlocks a Trophy you’ll need if you want to get Platinum for The Last of Us Part 2. Here’s every single Workbench in the game, divided by chapter, to help you get the most out of your weapons and stay alive as you seek revenge.

There’s tons of more coverage of The Last of Us Part 2 for your enjoyment now that the game is out, including the first part of this walkthrough. You can check out the rest of the walkthrough, as well as a suite of other guides in our huge The Last of Us Part II guide roundup–which also includes some essential tips you should know. If you’re curious about how the game stacks up, check out our The Last of Us Part II review.

Jackson

Patrol

Workbench 1: Library

After the blizzard kicks up, you’ll shelter in a library. As you explore, Dina will point out the Workbench and suggest you upgrade your guns. You can’t miss this one.

Seattle Day 1

Downtown

Workbench 2:5th and Marion Checkpoint

Use your map to navigate to the corner of 5th and Marion, where you’ll find an old FEDRA checkpoint and a sealed gated marked West Gate 2. Find a ladder near West Gate 2 and climb to get onto the checkpoint wall. Head around to the side to find some tents. Inside is your Workbench.

Capitol Hill (after leaving Eastbrook Elementary)

Workbench 3: Gas Station Garage

Head to the left from after passing through the motel to find a gas station down the road some. Attached to it is a garage whose door you can slip under to find the Workbench.

Workbench 4: Gym

As you continue toward the TV station, you’ll find an area with tripwire bombs. To get around them, break a nearby window on the right side of the street to get into a gym. Past the training dummies, in the back of the building, is the Workbench.

Tunnels

Workbench 5: Subway

Your path will divert into the subway after reaching the TV station. Keep moving until you come into a red-lit room with an acid-scoured body hung up in a hole in a fence–Ellie will comment on it. To the right of the body is a ladder you can climb, with the Workbench waiting at the top.

Seattle Day 2

Hillcrest

Workbench 6: Rosemont

Right after you enter Hillcrest, you’ll find stores you can go inside: Natural Remedies is right ahead, and The Rosemont clothing store is across from it on the other side of the street. Go inside Rosemont and to the back of the shop, where you’ll find a hole in the wall leading to the basement. You’ll find a Workbench waiting there, along with artifacts suggesting the place belonged to an archer named Boris.

Workbench 7: Bike Shop

Your path through Hillcrest will drop you into the basement of the bike shop and the Workbench that waits there. This is another one you can’t miss.

The Seraphites (Seattle Day 2 – Dusk)

Workbench 8: WLF Apartment Safehouse

Your path will bring you to a locked metal gate that you can’t open (if you hop to the other side, you’ll find a puzzle involving a dumpster you’ll need to solve). On the other side of the street is an apartment building with a truck you can climb to access the second floor. Get inside to find an apartment you can scavenge, then leave to access the hallway. Across from the apartment you left is another one–in the back, you’ll find the Workbench.

Workbench 9: Weston’s Pharmacy

Once you’ve passed through the Merci building, you’ll drop into a pool and climb out on the other side of the road. Look for Weston’s on the left side of the path forward. There are a lot of supplies inside, as well as a safe, and a Workbench in the pharmacy’s back room.

Seattle Day 3

Road to the Aquarium

Workbench 10: Store’s Barricaded Room

After you leave the theater, your path toward the aquarium will divert you through a storefront, and then into the back hallways of the building between shops. As you head down the hall, look for a blocked door on your right, which you can crawl under. The Workbench is inside.

Workbench 11: Department Store Office

You’ll pass an area with a lot of scaffolding in front of storefronts before attempting to make your way up to a footbridge between two buildings. Your path will take you to the left through a destroyed, multi-level department store. Climb to the top floor, but instead of heading to the bridge, turn around and look for a path to the offices behind you. The Workbench is waiting among them.

The Flooded City

Workbench 12: Manufacturing Building

Once you’re done with the mall, you’ll get a boat that you can use to traverse the rest of Seattle to get to the aquarium. Continue until you ride down some rapids and Ellie is forced to restart the boat’s motor. From here, look ahead for a storefront with a blue awning and a sign that reads “Manufacturing.” Hop out of the boat and go in to find the Workbench.

Workbench 13: Barcade

Eventually, you’ll take your boat into the flooded front of a barcade restaurant. The path is blocked here by a gate you have to raise, but the chain is obstructed by debris, forcing you to get out. You’ll find stairs in the back to get to the barcade’s second floor; head to the right, past the arcade machines and pool table, to find the Workbench against the right wall.

Seattle Day 1

On Foot

Workbench 14: Boat Repair Shop

After passing through the hardware store, you’ll use a rope to climb up on top of a boat shop and enter it from the roof. The Workbench is inside and hard to miss as you pass through the building.

The Forward Base

Workbench 15: Tents Outside Hotel

Another one that’s tough to miss, this Workbench is located in one of the green tents as you walk toward Serevena Hotel.

Hostile Territory (Seattle Day 1 – Dusk)

Workbench 16: Scar Camp

Once you’ve pushed through the destroyed building and climbed to the top, you’ll exit into an abandoned Scar camp on an outdoor patio. You’ll find the Workbench in the back corner before you leave.

The Forest

Workbench 17: Garage

After you exit the forest, you’ll slip under the door of an auto garage. The Workbench is against the back wall of the building.

The Coast

Workbench 18: Construction Site Office

Keep moving until you hit a construction site. Climb over the fence and enter the building on the far side to find the Workbench inside.

Seattle Day 2

The Shortcut

Workbench 19: Cellphone Store

Your meandering path will take you up the rapids that have flooded the street, through several stores. After you’ve gone through the apartment that takes you to the roof with the arrows, you’ll soon enter a cellphone store. Look to the left of the entrance to find a Workbench against the wall.

Workbench 20: Near the Prophet Shrine

Once you’ve entered the skyscraper, you’ll ascend toward the sky bridge. Keep going until you see the Prophet Shrine; in the next room is the Workbench.

Ground Zero

Hospital

Workbench 21: Electrical Room

Working through the hospital, you’ll find several of the doors are locked without power. Eventually, you’ll climb into the electrical room, where you can restore the hospital’s generator and power up the doors. There’s a Workbench in the same room.

Seattle Day 3

The Island

Workbench 22: Past The Logging Camp

Making your way across the island will take you to the Logging Camp, and you’ll have to cross through the mill on the far side to continue. The other side is empty of Seraphites, and just ahead, you’ll come to a pair of buildings. The one on the right contains another shrine, but the one on the left has a Workbench inside.

The Escape – Old Town

Workbench 23: Radio Station

When you get to the Old Town section of the island, you’ll make your way to a radio station, which you’ll enter from the roof. The Workbench is inside.

Santa Barbara

Pushing Inland

Workbench 24: Mansion Kitchen

You trip through Santa Barbara will take you down a street where you’ll encounter some infected, and you’ll then spot a clicker on a rooftop. Heading through the hole in the roof, you’ll enter the mansion and then drop down to floor below. Check to your right to find a Workbench in the kitchen.

The Resort

Workbench 25: Workshop

You’ll enter the resort by crawling through a hole in the fence after following the train tracks. Once you get inside, just ahead of you will be a workshop building, past a tent, in the center of the yard. The final Workbench is inside.

The Last of Us 2 News

  • The Last Of Us Part 2 Review (Spoilers)
  • The Last Of Us 2 Collectibles Guides – Where To Find Everything In The Game
  • The Last Of Us 2 Walkthrough, Guides, And Beginner's Tips (Spoiler-Free)
  • How Long Is The Last Of Us Part 2: Game Length Explained

Source: Read Full Article

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PS4

The Last Of Us 2 Downtown Seattle Collectibles Guide – Where To Find Everything

Warning: This guide minimizes spoilers to help keep the story fresh for you, even if you need help tracking down all the collectibles and items hidden throughout The Last of Us Part 2. However, if you want to know nothing about the game before playing, you should stop reading now.

Like Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, The Last of Us Part 2 has an open-ended area where you can take your time gathering resources and uncovering secrets in optional locations. To ensure you get the most out of this section, we’ve detailed below everything you can find, so you don’t miss a thing!

There’s tons of more coverage of The Last of Us Part 2 for your enjoyment now that the game is out, including the first part of this walkthrough. You can check out the rest of the walkthrough, as well as a suite of other guides in our huge The Last of Us Part II guide roundup–which also includes some essential tips you should know. If you’re curious about how the game stacks up, check out our The Last of Us Part II review.

Downtown Seattle

This section of Seattle is a large, open area you can explore at your leisure. You’ll need to visit the dome building and the courthouse to advance the story, but everything else is optional. That said, it’s worth checking everything–you’ll find a number of collectibles, notes, weapons, and upgrade materials hidden throughout the area, as well as tons of supplies. We’ve marked areas based on their locations on the map and their cross streets, in most cases. Ellie will also mark up the map as you go, both when you find notes that indicate potential stashes, and when you clear areas out.

We’ve found that some items in downtown are dynamic; if you take a different path than we did through the area, you might find some of them in different places than we did. The major locations will stay the same on the map, and while you might locate different objects at some of them, you should still find something at each spot we’ve marked.

Westlake Bank (5th and James)

Check the Safe Deposit Box Room for a bag on the floor near a body. You’ll find the Bank Heist Plans artifact with the vault code. The vault safe is on the left wall and opens to the code 60-23-06.

Inside you’ll find the Pump Action Shotgun weapon on a body. To the right of the body is the Bank Robber Letter artifact. Check the corner for a safety deposit box that holds the Antique Ring artifact, which will unlock the So Great And Small Trophy.

6th and Marion St.

Look for a staircase around the back of the destroyed wall of the building. Climb it and throw a brick through the window to get outside. Continue to the top and open the cases you find there to discover some supplements and the Doctor Uckmann Trading Card.

6th and Spring (under the highway)

Look inside the FEDRA truck spray painted “FASCISTS”. You’ll find the Note to Informant artifact inside.

6th and Spring (across from the Courthouse)

Head to the south side of the courthouse, to the building across the street at 5th and Madison. You’ll see stairs; go up and open a bag on the ground to find the WLF Community Supply Chest Note artifact, which will give you a line on a nearby supply cache.

West Gate 2 (Madison between 5th and 6th)

Head south from the courthouse and slip through the fence at West Gate 2. Around the back, you’ll find a safe. Open it with the West Gate 2 gate code: 0451. Inside is a mess of useful supplies, including ammo, supplements, and the Flo Trading Card.

5th and Marion (Checkpoint, Music Shop)

Near West Gate 2, climb the ladder to get onto the checkpoint wall. Head around to the side to find some tents. You’ll find some parts and, most usefully, a Workbench.

On the bridge that leads to the music shop from the workbench, look in the guard tower for the Street Drawing artifact. You’ll also trigger a Journal Entry right afterward if you stay in the lookout tower for a second.

Climb back up the wall and head to the left. A walkway will take you to an open window where you can enter a Music Shop. Look for a guitar case in the back room to trigger a cutscene. Downstairs, look in a drawer behind the clerk’s counter for the Das Wort Trading Card.

5th and Columbia

Not much here except a piece of destroyed wall near Westlake Bank. Look for a bag near a skeleton that contains the Cache Hunter’s Note artifact, pointing you toward Westlake Bank.

6th and Columbia (Plaza with Tank)

Look for a skeleton west of the tank with a bag beside it, containing the Letter from Isaac artifact that mentions WLF tunnels.

Highway Overpass (6th and Marion)

Approaching from Marion street, you’ll see some collapsed roads and a fire engine. Ride to where the military trucks are parked, get out, and climb the one closest to the edge near the fire engine. You can jump across from that one to the other overpass. Check the fire engine for a fire ax melee weapon. Go around the right side of the engine to find a rope you can use to repel down over the edge of the overpass. Swing down to the chunk of broken highway below to get inside a cargo crate. Inside is a Training Manual and some supplements.

5th and Spring North Corner (Coffee Shop)

Break the window to get inside the coffee shop. Get the WLF Safe House Supply Note artifact off the counter, as well as ammo and parts. Check the drawer in the back corner for the Big Blue Trading Card.

Head into the bathroom and look on the baby changing table for the key to Barko’s at 900 Marion and 6th.

Barko’s (Marion and 6th)

Just inside, check the copier for the Join WLF Note artifact. You can also activate an optional conversation after you inspect it. Get supplements from the shelf ahead on the left. Find a Stun Bomb on the table past the whiteboard, which unlocks a new crafting recipe. In the back room, grab a Long Gun Holster off the counter to make it easier to switch between your weapons.

Dome Synagogue (5th and Marion)

Look for a ladder on the left side of the building’s facade to get up to the upper level. Check the guard booth on the wall for the Emergency Protocols Memo artifact in a drawer. To get in, go around the left side of the building, to a lower area where you can slip through a chained gate.

Inside, you can scavenge quite a bit from the lower floor. Use the rolling crate from near the gas tank to reach the upper floor, boosting yourself up by the exit gate. Continually talk to Dina in the offices to access a Journal Entry. After swinging on the cable, open the rabbi’s office before you leave and check the desk drawer to find the Rabbi Saunders’ Letter artifact.

Courthouse (6th and Spring)

After clearing the infected on the first floor, look for supplements in the room just past the courtroom, with the computers inside.

When you go down the stairs, check the FEDRA bodies for the Plea to a Friend Letter artifact. Break the nearby window and jump through to find a body with a machete in it and Lt. Torres’ Final Memorandum artifact. The file cabinet holds the List of Known WLF Agitators artifact.

Check under the desk beneath the window for a safe. The code is 86-07-22.

Gate

Return to East Gate 2 and use the gas to power the generator and open it. The code is 5345.

The Last of Us 2 News

  • The Last Of Us Part 2 Review (Spoilers)
  • The Last Of Us 2 Collectibles Guides – Where To Find Everything In The Game
  • The Last Of Us 2 Walkthrough, Guides, And Beginner's Tips (Spoiler-Free)
  • How Long Is The Last Of Us Part 2: Game Length Explained

Source: Read Full Article

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PS4

Last Of Us 2 Director Responds To Internet Hate

Seven years after the release of the original, The Last of Us Part II is finally out now on PlayStation 4. Even before release, writer-director Neil Druckmann acknowledged that some fans of the first game would dislike the sequel, and now that the game is out, he’s responded to more of the internet hate.

Speaking on former Nintendo boss Reggie Fils-Aime’s podcast, Druckmann said it’s worthless to fight against people when they share their opinions about a game–whether it be good or bad. However, Druckmann said he can’t understand how people get so worked up and upset about fictional characters.

“I think you have to create some separation to say, we made this game, we believe in this game, we’re proud of this game, now it’s out there and it’s like whatever reaction people have–whether they like it or not–that’s fair,” Druckmann said. “That’s their reaction and you don’t fight that. The other thing with the more hateful stuff, the more vile stuff, that’s a little harder. It’s especially harder when I see it happening to team members or cast members who play a particular character in the game.”

“We have an actor, she’s been getting really awful, vile stuff because of a fictional character she’s playing in the game,” Druckmann added. “I just have a hard time wrapping my mind around that. The thing I try to do is just ignore it as much as I can. When things escalate to being serious, there are certain security protocols that we take and I report it to the proper authorities. Then you just try to focus on the positives and focus on distracting yourself with other stuff. But it’s kind of just the reality.”

Also in the interview, Druckmann said he’s been speaking with Chernobyl writer Craig Mazin about this topic. They are currently working together on the HBO TV version of The Last of Us.

“I’ve had a lot of conversations with him about this stuff. He articulated it pretty well, it’s like people have to get educated. This is kind of the cost. When you’re doing something big, and you might disappoint fans, there is a cost to it now,” Druckmann said. “Which is, you’re going to get a certain level of hate, a certain level of vitriol that you just have to deal with. There is no other way to make it go away.”

Despite some portion of the audience disliking The Last of Us Part II, the game broke PlayStation’s sales records with 4 million copies sold in its first three days.

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eSports

Fortnite leaker gives us early look at rumored Aquaman / Atlantis POI

Fortnite fans seem to be enjoying the various map changes Epic Games made in Chapter 2 – Season 3. The new water areas are fun and exciting to navigate through whether you’re on a boat or riding a shark. Of course, it would be naive for us to think the map will stay this way for the duration of Season 3. We already know the water on the map will recede back into the ocean as the season goes on. This process will make way for new POIs to pop up, and it could include an Atlantis location for Aquaman.

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      Atlantis coming soon to Fortnite?

      For the past two seasons, Epic Games has included a superhero skin in Fortnite‘s Battle Pass. In Chapter 2 – Season 2 we had Deadpool and all of his hilarious hijinx. In Season 3, there’s Aquaman and his human form, Arthur Curry.

      Of course, no one has unlocked either of these skins due to Aquaman’s challenges only unlocking once per week. There are five challenges in total, so we still have a few weeks left before the skins become available.

      However, when Aquaman does make himself available in Fortnite, we could see more than just his skins arrive. If you played last season, you know that Deadpool had his own Yacht Party during Week 8. Incidentally, this was around one week after Deadpool’s skin was released in Fortnite.

      There have been numerous leaks that Aquaman will receive the same treatment in Season 3. Rumor has it that an Atlantis POI will be coming to Fortnite since it’s where Aquaman originates from. While there’s no concrete proof, we do have a leak that shows us where the POI will potentially be located.

      This location is present thanks to the leaker removing the water that currently resides there. As previously stated, the water will recede as the season progresses. Currently, in the files, this big desert in the video is what’s underneath this location’s mass of water. So, it’s plausible to think that Epic Games will eventually put Atlantis around this POI once the water recedes.

      As the weeks go on, we should see more information make its way to the Fortnite files. We’ll keep you updated with any developments here at Daily Esports.

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      PS4

      The Last Of Us Part 2 Hidden Trophies Guide: How To Get The Platinum

      There are a whole bunch of Trophies to find in The Last of Us Part 2. Many of them are linked to scavenging, requiring you to scour the world for collectibles, weapons, workbenches, and other items and elements you can use to make yourself stronger and more survivable. A few, however, are about more story-focused moments, and they’re easy to miss if you don’t know they’re happening.

      Lucky for you, we’ve tracked down every Trophy in The Last of Us Part 2 and we know exactly how to earn them. The guide below will point out where you can unlock each one. Be warned that this is spoiler territory, however, so go at your own risk. Any information you see beyond this point is liable to reveal story elements to you that are best discovered on your own.

      Check out our spoiler-free walkthrough, as well as a suite of other guides, in our huge The Last of Us Part II guide roundup–which also includes some essential tips you should know. If you’re curious about how the game stacks up, check out our The Last of Us Part II review.

      Looks Good On You Trophy

      Found: Seattle Day 1 – The Birthday Gift

      You can get this trophy during the first flashback you play through with Joel and Ellie. The scene takes place in a museum, where the pair can visit a number of exhibits. Right after you enter the first room of the museum, you can find a brown hat on a rack, which Ellie will wear. As you wander through the dinosaur exhibit, you’ll then get the opportunity to put the hat on the various skeletons, and then take it back off.

      While you’re going, pay attention for a chance to ask Joel to get him to try it on. You’ll want to move slowly through the exhibit and interact with all the dinosaurs, because the prompt to get the Trophy is contextual and you won’t want to miss your opportunity by going too quickly. After putting the hat on two or three skeletons, you should get an optional prompt to put the hat on Joel. Once you’ve done it, you’ll earn the Looks Good On You Trophy.

      Sharpshooter Trophy

      Seattle Day 1 – The Stadium

      Before heading out from the stadium, you’ll drop by the armory and pick up weapons. If you spin around from the quartermaster’s table before leaving, you’ll see a shooting range where you can test your guns. You also have a chance for a little friendly competition with Manny. Your goal is to beat him in a shooting contest. The best way to do that is to score all headshots, which isn’t too difficult. Take your time and line up your shots–the assault rifle is probably your best bet for this one because of its larger magazine and faster rate of fire.

      The contest isn’t especially difficult to win, and once you do, you’ll earn the Sharpshooter Trophy.

      Put My Name Up Trophy

      Seattle Day 1 – Winter Visit

      The last hidden trophy pops up during a second flashback in the aquarium. You’ll reach it at the end of the Hostile Territory section, after dealing with Scars in a few abandoned, destroyed buildings. The Trophy is another shooting contest, recalling a similar moment in Uncharted 4. You’ll see a toy bow on the ground in the middle of the aquarium, with a bunch of cardboard targets scattered around the room. The contest has you shooting the targets, with the goal of hitting as many as you can before a timer runs out. You don’t need to be a sharpshooter here. Your accuracy in hitting the target doesn’t matter, and you can shoot them from anywhere. This one is all about speed, but the tough part is in anticipating how much the arrows will drop as your range to a target increases.

      A good strategy is to try to spot all the targets before you start the game, so you know where to shoot–especially toward the end, you’re liable to run out of time trying to find your last few targets. It’s a good idea to save right before you start so you can quickly retry to minigame if you run out of time. Earn the high score and you get the Put My Name Up Trophy, completing your hidden collection.

      The Last of Us 2 News

      • The Last Of Us Part 2 Review (Spoilers)
      • The Last Of Us 2 Collectibles Guides – Where To Find Everything In The Game
      • The Last Of Us 2 Walkthrough, Guides, And Beginner's Tips (Spoiler-Free)
      • How Long Is The Last Of Us Part 2: Game Length Explained

      Source: Read Full Article

      Categories
      PS4

      The Last Of Us Part 2 Hospital Boss Guide – Seattle Day 2: Ground Zero

      Note: We’ve gone out of our way to avoid spoilers for anything that happens in The Last of Us Part 2, but looking at any photos or reading any descriptions might give away plot details you’d rather now know. If you’re hoping to remain completely unspoiled, we recommend playing through the game first.

      Surviving in The Last of Us Part 2 requires you to sneak past both hostile humans and the deadly infected–but sometimes, you have to fight. There aren’t many battles that could be considered “boss fights” in The Last of Us Part 2, but you’ll know them when you get to them.

      Read on for the strategies that’ll help you get through one of The Last of Us Part 2’s toughest moments: the battle in the hospital during Seattle Day 2’s Ground Zero chapter.

      Check out our spoiler-free walkthrough, as well as a suite of other guides, in our huge The Last of Us Part II guide roundup–which also includes some essential tips you should know. If you’re curious about how the game stacks up, check out our The Last of Us Part II review.

      Boss Fight – Giant Infected

      You’ll face this boss as you explore the hospital basement in the Ground Zero mission. This thing is pretty similar to a Bloater–it’ll charge you and kill you if it can grab hold of you, and it’ll barrel through walls to come after you. It can also throw explosive objects at you, so you’ll need to be careful, but the creature’s biggest danger is that it’ll keep coming for you.

      The area where the fight takes place is the real enemy here, because it’s easy to get boxed into a corner, lose track of where you are, and get run down and murdered. It’s dark and murky throughout, making it tough to spot doors, ledges, holes, and windows you can move through, but playing keep-away from the boss is essential. This thing will take a ton of punishment to bring down, so your most important goal is to keep your distance so you can protect yourself, do some damage, and craft items you need whenever possible.

      Often the best way to deal with the boss is to find a spot where there’s a central pillar or object you can move around, forcing the boss to circle with you. You might not do a lot of damage during these portions, but you’ll be able to stay out of danger and plot your next move. It’ll take a lot of damage to kill the boss, so focus on staying alive and managing space first and foremost; you’re not going to bring it down by shooting it a bunch before it gets to you.

      Go for high-damage weapons for this fight: pipe bombs, your shotgun (and its incendiary rounds), and the Hunting Pistol are all good bets, while you can save your other weapons for when ammo is low. The Flamethrower works too, but its shorter range means you’ll need to let the boss get close before you use it, and it won’t slow him down any. You’ll find lots of gear scattered around the area if you need it, but since it’ll often push you into corners, make sure you have lots of room to maneuver before going for it.

      Do enough damage and a smaller Stalker boss will peel off from the larger creature, forcing you to fight two creatures at once. Keep an eye out for this guy but don’t worry about doing a ton of damage to him–if you hurt the large boss enough, you’ll win this portion of the fight. Shoot the Stalker when it comes after you to force it to leave, but watch out that it doesn’t tangle you up and make you vulnerable to being one-shotted by the larger boss. Keeping shivs on-hand will make getting away easier.

      Keep running and dealing damage until the big boss finally goes down. The Stalker will have escaped, forcing you to find and kill it in the next area of the hospital, the morgue. Though the Stalker is dangerous, it’s not nearly as deadly as the big boss, and your experience fighting other versions of this enemy will come into play here. Use the strongest guns you have left to wallop it, and if you need to, try to get away so you can go into stealth and resume the fight on your terms. When the battle is over, you’ll be able to exit into the parking garage.

      The Last of Us 2 News

      • The Last Of Us Part 2 Review (Spoilers)
      • The Last Of Us 2 Collectibles Guides – Where To Find Everything In The Game
      • The Last Of Us 2 Walkthrough, Guides, And Beginner's Tips (Spoiler-Free)
      • How Long Is The Last Of Us Part 2: Game Length Explained

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      The Last of Us Part 2 guide: Seattle Day 3 – The Flooded City collectibles walkthrough

      Polygon’s The Last of Us Part 2 Seattle Day 3 – The Flooded City collectibles guide begins when Ellie arrives in the section of the river with the ice cream truck. It ends when Ellie reaches shore outside the aquarium. There are 6 Artifacts, 2 Trading Cards, 1 Journal Entry, 2 Workbenches, and 1 Safe to find in The Flooded City.

      Seff-L’Ho’Phad Trading Card location

      The Flooded City Trading Card 1 of 2

      Pilot the boat through the rapids until you reach the first gate blocking forward progress. Get out of the boat and double back. There’s a room right next to the spot where the rapids break. Go in and walk to the desk at the far right end of the room. Open the right hand drawer to find a trading card for Seff-L’Ho’Phad, a neutral, interdimensional giant squid.

    • Seff-L’Ho’Phad Trading Card location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Seff-L’Ho’Phad Trading Card location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Seff-L’Ho’Phad Trading Card location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Ferris Wheel Journal Entry location

      The Flooded City Journal Entry 1 of 1

      Exit the room where you found the Seff-L’Ho’Phad trading card and double back toward the gate. Turn left to find the stairs and take them to the second floor. Approach the window which faces the Ferris wheel to get a new journal entry, revealing some of Ellie’s thoughts as she gets closer to Abby.

    • Ferris Wheel Journal Entry location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Ferris Wheel Journal Entry location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Stash Note Artifact location

      The Flooded City Artifact 1 of 6

      From the Ferris Wheel Journal Entry location, turn left to find a dead man, Randall, and his letter to someone named Beth. The note includes a combination 70-12-64.

    • Stash Note Artifact location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Stash Note Artifact location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Safe location

      The Flooded City Safe 1 of 1

      With the safe combination in hand, walk to the other end of the room, and roll the box out of the way. Go prone and crawl through until you’re above the fenced-in area to the right of the gate. Drop down and use the code 70-12-64 on the safe to grab some ammo.

    • Safe 1 of 1 location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Safe 1 of 1 location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Safe 1 of 1 location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Safe 1 of 1 location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Workbench 1 location

      The Flooded City Workbench 1 of 2

      As you progress through the flooded city, look for a building whose opening is surrounded by blue tarps. It’s on the left side of the river, opposite Seattle Sleep Warehouse. Inside, you’ll find a workbench.

    • Workbench 1 of 2 location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Workbench 1 of 2 location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Shambler Note Artifact location

      The Flooded City Artifact 2 of 6

      After passing through the Seattle Sleep Warehouse area, look out for the flooded Carthy Hotel on your right. In the non-flooded corner, look for a skeleton near a wrecked ship. Next to the corpse, there’s a letter with a drawing of a Shambler warning any Wolves that come across it that this new infected variant is real and awful.

    • Shambler Note Artifact location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Shambler Note Artifact location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Encampment Note Artifact location

      The Flooded City Artifact 4 of 6

      From the Scar Prophet’s portrait in the building where you fought the Scars, turn left and back toward the windows. On a light blue pillar with cracked paint, you’ll find a letter from Gray, who the Scars have now renamed Emmett, to Jules.

    • Encampment Note Artifact location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Encampment Note Artifact location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Arcade Flyer Artifact location

      The Flooded City Artifact 5 of 6

      When you arrive in W&B Arcade, park your boat near the gate and turn back. On one of the booths on the right, you’ll find a flyer advertising !!Fright Nites!!

      Arcade Flyer Artifact location.
      Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon

      Workbench 2 location

      The Flooded City Workbench 2 of 2

      Head up the stairs to the second floor. On the opposite wall, next to Moto Flare and air hockey, you’ll find a workbench.

      Workbench 2 of 2 location.
      Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon

      Khazakh Bright Trading Card location

      The Flooded City Trading Card 2 of 2

      After taking down the Bloater in the W&B Arcade basement, open the rolling window into the Prize Zone. Hop the counter and turn right to find a trading card, for neutral villain Khazakh Bright, under the glass.

    • Khazakh Bright Trading Card location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Khazakh Bright Trading Card location. Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Arcade Note Artifact location

      The Flooded City Artifact 6 of 6

      From the Prize Zone, take the stairs up a floor, and then turn right and walk until you reach PC Cafe, a room with a bunch of computers. Look to your immediate left as you enter to find the last letter from Emmett to Jules, in which he describes encountering the Bloater in the basement.

    • Arcade Note Artifact location Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
    • Arcade Note Artifact location Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Computer Entertainment America via Polygon
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      The Last of Us 2 epitomizes one of gaming’s longest debates

      The Last of Us Part 2 punctuates one the longest, strangest debates in video games: the 13-year discussion of ludonarrative dissonance.

      The term references the disconnect between what players do in a video game (ludo is Latin for play) and the story that the game tells (narrative). People were discussing this idea under different terms long before the phrase exploded in 2007, in part due to an oft-cited blog post by game designer Clint Hocking that made use of the term. After that, big-budget video games collectively calcified around its central dilemma. This was the year BioShock and Uncharted debuted. Critics cited games like these as evidence that the medium was “growing up,” while also acknowledging that ludonarrative dissonance was the messy side-effect of this flat-footed quest for maturity.

      The phrase became a buzzword, appearing in game developer panels and debated in video game writer listservs. Like so many academic terms, it spiraled onto social media, losing its context, becoming a quick insult for violent games that aspired to be high art but fell short. But the core dilemma — How do game makers marry story and play? Should they even try? — never went away.

      Big-budget video game studios of the late ’00s wanted to tell serious, adult, and human stories. You know, the types of stories that appear in award-winning films and books. But they were still making games with the dominant “verb” of that generation and this one: shoot.

      Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Interactive Entertainment via Polygon

      In video games, shooting stuff has been a beloved dopamine hit for nearly four decades. Point at something, pull the trigger, and watch that something explode, dematerialize, or ragdoll down a flight of stairs. Shoot and kill. Cause and effect reduced to its simplest form.

      Early 3D first-person shooters, from Doom and Rise of the Triad to Unreal and GoldenEye, found tremendous success. Because the majority of the best game designers made shooters, the genre rapidly improved, getting AAA video games stuck into a self-fulfilling loop. Shooters became the most polished games, so they sold better, thus publishers greenlit more and better shooters, which sold better.

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      The Last of Us Part 2 review: We’re better than this

      In the 1990s and 2000s, game publishers built all sorts of shooters. First-person. Third-person. Shoot-’em-ups. Shooters with campaigns and multiplayer. Hell, even puzzle games got guns. But by 2007, critics began to express something like shooter fatigue. A majority of video game publications in that year awarded game of the year not to BioShock, Portal, Modern Warfare, or Mass Effect. They gave the honor to Super Mario Galaxy.

      Despite the unprecedented success of the shooter genre, the creators of shooters seemed similarly burnt out. They started telling serious stories about complicated heroes and heroines, stories that ignored the fact that the protagonist had slaughtered hundreds of people along the way.

      And that’s why, in 2007, game critics could not stop talking about ludonarrative dissonance.

      Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Interactive Entertainment via Polygon

      The Last of Us Part 2’s studio helped launch the debate

      Uncharted: Drake’s Fortune, created by Naughty Dog, the same studio that went on to develop The Last of Us Part 2, became one of the poster children of this bizarre moment, in which games aspired for bigger things while still bearing violent albatrosses of the genre. Its protagonist, Nathan Drake, is a lovable, goofy treasure hunter. Except, the very first moment we meet him, he reveals his other talent: cold-blooded killing.

      Drake and his companion, journalist Elena Fisher, uncover a treasure in the middle of the ocean, only to be immediately surrounded by a fleet of pirate boats. Elena suggests they contact the authorities. Drake explains they’re searching for treasure illegally. So he pulls out his old friend: a big-ass handgun. He hands a bonus gun to Elena, who has never handled a gun but, coincidentally, is a great shot.

      The first time we control Drake, it’s to slaughter a couple dozen humans, setting the tone for the entire series. We encounter a dissonance between the story (fun treasure hunters) and the gameplay (white guy who travels to foreign lands and wholesale slaughter dozens, if not hundreds, of humans who stand in your way). (This actually aligns with the real history of treasure hunting, but the game never digs into that.)

      The contrast between Drake the treasure hunter and Drake the serial killer was so stark that it became something more than a punchline. It was a word of warning. For a beat, game creators across the spectrum, from indie to AAA, appeared to have correctly diagnosed the problem. To tell adult stories, they’d need more and better verbs. The action would need to better align with the story.

      Related

      The Last of Us Part 2 collectibles guide

      After hundreds of blogs, Twitter threads, and essays published in what remained of game magazines at the time, critics tacitly agreed to never mention the words “ludonarrative dissonance” again, but here I am, breaking the blood oath. The challenge of ludonarrative dissonance never went away, it just shifted from something critics discussed into a riddle many developers are still attempting to solve.

      Some indie game makers cut violent actions from their games altogether, leading to a spate of “walking simulators” like Dear Esther and Proteus, first-person games more interested in the space around the player rather than what they do inside that space. Designers who had worked on the BioShock series left to create Gone Home and The Blackout Club, a pair of games that retained the tension and mystery of their AAA predecessors, while showing what stories could bloom when guns got cut from the equation.

      But for AAA studios, the allure of violence and its financial security was irresistible. Because at the end of the day, publishers decide what games get greenlit, and they answer to a board that expects profits. Guns make money.

      Image: Yager Development/2K Games

      Should violent video games narratively justify their obsession with violence?

      In the early ’10s, big-budget games, unable to move the action closer to the story, moved the story closer to the action. In other words, game designers made “mature” games about violence. Games like Spec Ops: The Line forced us to commit battlefield atrocities, like dropping white phosphorus on civilians, and then wagged their finger at us for… playing the game they designed? After the credits rolled, we could play a multiplayer mode that let us commit all the murder we wanted with none of the cutscene-induced guilt. Indie games took their shot at this too, most notably the Hotline Miami series.

      Some of these games did a fine job highlighting the medium’s fetishization of violence. Plenty of others mistook moral ambiguity for profundity. Big-budget video game storytelling was largely treading water by this point, being produced, in part, by designers who wanted to create art but were paid to make hyper-realistic weapons of machine guns — and also in part by people who just wanted to make badass kill animations and not worry about a big message. As games grew, so did teams, and suddenly squads of hundreds (even thousands) of people were creating games, many of them with conflicting ideas of what those games should be.

      As a result, these self-aware violent video games still never fully aligned the action with the narrative. Which is to say, despite all the hand-wringing, these games were first and foremost “fun,” the gameplay still emphasizing the pleasure of pointing at a target and spewing hot lead.

      Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Interactive Entertainment via Polygon

      The Last of Us Part 2 is the culmination of this decade of big-budget games interrogating dissonance. Naughty Dog, the creators of Uncharted, have finally bridged the gap between story and action, dragging the story kicking and screaming and gurgling on its own blood to align with what you actually do in their games: kill people. The result is surreal, an expensive narrative experiment depicting what would actually happen if a real human being behaved like a video game character.

      You play as Ellie, a young woman on a quest for revenge in a post-apocalyptic Seattle. The creators imagine a dystopian America, in which survivors have divided into warring factions, each convinced it’s good, each willing to commit horrendous acts of violence to protect itself. As Ellie eviscerates dozens of humans who cry for the help of a friend or beg for mercy, the story reveals these people aren’t as bad as Ellie once thought — that their motives are just as valid and complicated as her own.

      Ellie can’t change. Not because this is Greek tragedy. It really isn’t. I say that as a compliment! Storytelling has dramatically improved since Aristotle scribbled down the Poetics, and the writers begin the game with a handful of appealing threads about generational divides (made literal by the gap between those who lived for decades before the apocalypse and those who were just kids when the world changed) and the choice to build a family in a time of unknowable danger. These stories are the stories we need right now, and for a moment, it seems Ellie might just grow up and live a life that isn’t centered around heavy weaponry. But whenever The Last of Us Part 2 starts to be about something bigger, that thread is flatted by its relentless, suffocating violence.

      So no, Ellie can’t change. She can’t change because AAA games can’t change. Let’s say Ellie learns her lesson, that violence begets violence. That to save the world and herself, she must put down the gun. What would she even do? Literally, what would a AAA game even allow for her to do? AAA game design is built and marketed around killing. So I suppose Ellie would shift from killing humans to something more morally simple, like the zombie-like baddies that lurch about her world, which while less morally mucky, is no less predictable.

      Image: Naughty Dog/Sony Interactive Entertainment via Polygon

      Thirteen years ago, critics and designers imagined games would no longer have ludonarrative dissonance, that the stories video games want to tell would align with the actions they demand we commit. But if this is the result, then you know what, I’m cool with dissonance. I’ll take violent games that strive for fun and don’t pitch any greater meaning, rather than violent games that seek to justify their violence. I don’t need more stories asking me why I love to kill things in video games, because the answer is simple: It’s what publishers sell me. What I want most, and what The Last of Us Part 2 attempts to be in brief moments, are games without violence. Do the creators truly believe their story captures how people would behave, that we’re all a catastrophe away from forming tribal murder squads? Or do we keep getting stories like this because it’s what the video games, as we understand them, allow? Until we have an abundance of AAA games that don’t hinge on violence, we can’t know for certain.

      The Last of Us Part 2 suggests violence is inevitable. Sadly, that appears to be true in AAA video games.

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