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The Walking Dead: The Telltale Definitive Series Is Finally Available On Steam, And It’s Currently 40% Off

Skybound Games has recently announced that The Walking Dead: The Telltale Definitive Series, which includes all four Seasons, 400 Days, and The Walking Dead: Michonne with over 50 hours of gameplay across 23 unique episodes, is now available on PC via Steam at 40% off, marked down from $49.99 to $29.99.

The series bundle will be on sale during Steam’s Halloween Sale through November 2. Skybound Games has also announced that it will release the bundle to other digital PC platforms later this year. Originally launched on PS4, Xbox One, and the Epic Games Store in September 2019, the bundle also features more than ten hours of developer commentary, as well as behind-the-scenes bonus features, such as concept and character art galleries.

In addition, players can watch the Return of the Walking Dead documentary short, enjoy recreations of classic menus, and a music player with more than 140 tracks. The game, which has been a global success, has earned more than 100 Game of the Year awards and received two BAFTA Video Game Awards for Best Story.

Based on Robert Kirkman’s award-winning comic book franchise, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Definitive Series tells the full story of Clementine as she evolves from young girl to fearless fighter. A beacon of hope, Clementine reflects the endurance needed to survive in a post-apocalyptic world overrun by zombies and many humans who have turned to the dark side. Players will decide who Clementine trusts, loves and ultimately protects.

Kirkman has been actively involved in the development of the game franchise with Telltale. According to Kirkman, he had previously played Telltale’s Strong Bad’s Cool Game for Attractive People and believed the studio was “more focused on telling a good story, and I thought they were good at engaging the player in the narrative.” Telltale ultimately pitched a proposal which, according to the writer, “involved decision-making and consequences rather than ammunition gathering or jumping over things.”

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