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NZXT Recalls 32,000 H1 PC Cases In The US

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and the Government of Canada have issued a recall for the NZXT H1 PC case. Approximately, 32,000 PC cases are being recalled in the US, while 1,000 are being recalled in Canada. According to the recall notice, NZXT has received 11 reports of “circuit boards overheating or catching fire worldwide, six of which occurred in the U.S.”

Consumers who have bought the NZXT H1 PC case can request a repair kit from the H1 safety notice website or request a refund from their retailer. In a recent blog post, NZXT said a recall was set to be issued due to concerns over two metal screws in the case. Although the company was reportedly working on a solution, a product recall has been issued to prevent a potential fire hazard.

The NZXT H1 PC case was released in February 2020. The CPSC says that roughly 32,000 units were sold in the U.S., and 1,024 were sold in Canada. Consumers have been advised to “immediately stop using the recalled computer cases and contact NZXT for a free repair kit” so they can safely use their systems.

The issue with the PC case is that two screws on the PCIe riser assembly are too close to a 12V power on the connecting PCB, which can be a possible fire hazard. “The two screws that attach the PCIe Riser assembly to the chassis may cause an electrical short circuit in the printed circuit board that may overheat and create the possibility of a fire hazard,” the safety notice reads.

Nylon screws would prevent an immediate fire risk, however, NZXT recognizes that a permanent solution is needed to prevent the case from posing a danger. The information on the CPSC website states that customers should contact NZXT with the following details:

NZXT toll-free at 888-965-5520 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. PT Monday through Friday, by email at [email protected], or online at https://info.nzxt.com/h1-recall/ or www.nzxt.com and click on “Contact” then “Customer Support” for more information.

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